Fandom

Baseball Wiki

Willie McCovey

6,888pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

Willie McCovey

Willie mccovey autograph

Personal Info
Birth January 10, 1938, Mobile, Alabama
Professional Career
Debut July 30, 1959, San Francisco Giants vs. Philadelphia Phillies, Seals Stadium
Team(s) San Francisco Giants (1959-1974, 1977-1980)
San Diego Padres (1974-1976)
Oakland Athletics (1976)
HOF induction: 1986
Career Highlights
  • National League Rookie of the Year (1959)
  • NL MVP Award (1969)
  • 6-time All-Star (1963, 1966, 1968-71)
  • MVP of All-Star Game (1969)
  • 3-times led NL in home runs (1963, 1968-69)
  • 2-times led NL in RBI (1968-69)
  • 3-times led NL in slugging average (1968-70)
  • 3-times led NL in OPS (1968-70)
  • 4-times led NL in Intentional Walks (1969-70, 1971 and 1973)
  • 5-times led NL in At Bats per Home Run (1963, 1967-70)
  • 18 grand slams in his career (ranking fourth to Lou Gehrig's 23, Manny Ramirez's 20 and Eddie Murray's 19 and tied with Robin Ventura's 18.
  • 3-times named Player of the Month.

Willie Lee McCovey (born January 10, 1938 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed "Big Mac" and "Stretch", is a former slugger and first baseman who played Major League Baseball for the San Francisco Giants, San Diego Padres and Oakland Athletics between 1959 and 1980. He batted and threw left handed.

In his first game as a Major Leaguer on July 30, 1959, he went 4-for-4 against Hall Of Famer Robin Roberts en route to a .354 batting average that year. Three years later, the Giants were in the World Series against the New York Yankees. In the bottom of the 9th of Game 7 with 2 outs, Willie Mays on second and Matty Alou on third, and the Giants trailing 1-0, McCovey slapped a hard liner that was caught by the Yankees' second baseman Bobby Richardson. That would turn out to be the closest McCovey would get to being a world champion.

McCovey's best year was 1969 when he hit 45 Home Runs, had 126 RBIs and batted .320 to become the NL MVP.

In 1974, McCovey was traded to the San Diego Padres and without him the Giants and their fans declined. But after three mediocre seasons as a Padre, and appearing in 11 games for the Oakland Athletics at the end of the 1976 season, he returned in 1977 to the Giants. That year, during a June 27 game against the Cincinnati Reds, he became the first player to hit 2 home runs in 1 inning twice in his career (the first was on April 12, 1973). One was a grand slam and he became the first National Leaguer to hit seventeen. At age 39, he had 28 home runs and 86 Runs Batted In and was named the Major League Baseball Comeback Player Of The Year.

On June 30, 1978, at Atlanta's Fulton County Stadium, McCovey hit his 500th home run, and 2 years later, on May 3 at San Francisco's Candlestick Park, his 521st and last home run. The home run (off Scott Sanderson of Montreal) tied him with Ted Williams at 521 - and gave him the distinction of joining Ted Williams as the only players to hit home runs in 4 different decades.

In his 22-year career (19 with the Giants), McCovey batted .270, with 521 home runs and 1555 RBI, 1229 runs scored, 2211 hits, 353 doubles, 46 triples, a .374 on base percentage and a .515 slugging average.

Baseball Hof
Willie McCovey
is a member of
the Baseball
Hall of Fame
File:Pbpview2.jpg

McCovey was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986, his first year of eligibility. In 1999, he ranked Number 56 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was nominated as a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. McCovey Cove behind the outfield wall of the Giants' AT&T Park was named after him. The Giants retired his uniform number 44, which he wore in honor of Hank Aaron, a fellow Mobile, Alabama native.

In September 2003, McCovey and a business partner opened McCovey's Restaurant, a baseball-themed sports bar and restaurant, located in Walnut Creek, California.

See alsoEdit

TriviaEdit

  • McCovey wasn't the first player to triple against Robin Roberts in his major league debut. Curt Roberts, the first black player in Pittsburgh Pirates history, did it five years earlier. {Forbes Field -- April 13, 1954}
  • Shortly after the 1962 World Series ended, Peanuts cartoonist and Giants fan Charles M. Schulz drew a comic strip with Charlie Brown sitting glumly with Linus, lamenting in the last panel, "Why couldn't McCovey have hit the ball just three feet higher?" Later, he drew an identical strip, except in the last panel Charlie moaned, "Or why couldn't McCovey have hit the ball just two feet higher?"

External linksEdit

Preceded by:
Don Drysdale
Major League Player of the Month
August 1959 (with Vern Law)
Succeeded by:
Eddie Mathews
Preceded by:
Orlando Cepeda
National League Rookie of the Year
1959
Succeeded by:
Frank Howard
Preceded by:
Ron Santo
Major League Player of the Month
July 1963
Succeeded by:
Willie Mays
Preceded by:
Willie Mays
National League Home Run Champion
1963
(with Hank Aaron)
Succeeded by:
Willie Mays
Preceded by:
Hank Aaron
National League Home Run Champion
1968–1969
Succeeded by:
Johnny Bench
Preceded by:
Orlando Cepeda
National League RBI Champion
1968-1969
Succeeded by:
Johnny Bench
Preceded by:
Steve Blass
Major League Player of the Month
April 1969
Succeeded by:
Ken Holtzman
Preceded by:
Bob Gibson
National League Most Valuable Player
1969
Succeeded by:
Johnny Bench
Preceded by:
Willie Mays
Major League Baseball All-Star Game
Most Valuable Player

1969
Succeeded by:
Carl Yastrzemski
Preceded by:
Tommy John
NL Comeback Player of the Year
1977
Succeeded by:
Willie Stargell

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki