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Ron Cey

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Ron Cey

A photo of Ron Cey.

Ronald Charles (Ron) Cey (Template:PronEng, born February 15, 1948 in Tacoma, Washington) is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1971-82), Chicago Cubs (1983-86) and Oakland Athletics (1987). Cey batted and threw right-handed. A popular player, he was nicknamed "The Penguin" for his slow waddling running gait by his then-minor league manager Tommy Lasorda. Another famous nickname for Cey was given to him by Chris Berman of ESPN. He said his name as Ron "Born in the U.S." Cey.

A graduate of Mount Tahoma High School, Cey attended Washington State University and was a member of Phi Delta Theta.

With the Dodgers, third baseman Cey was part of an All-Star infield that included Steve Garvey (first baseman), Davey Lopes (second baseman) and Bill Russell (shortstop).

In a 17-season career, Cey was a .261 hitter with 316 home runs and 1139 RBI in 2073 games.

Cey had a terrific 1981 World Series in which he helped spark the Dodgers to four straight victories after they had lost the first two games, including his returning for the clinching Game 6 after having been being hit in the head by a Goose Gossage fastball during Game 5. Cey was named Co-MVP along with Steve Yeager and Pedro Guerrero.

Career Hitting[1]
G AB H 2B 3B HR R RBI SB BB SO AVG OBP SLG OPS
2,073 7,162 1,868 328 21 316 977 1,139 24 1,012 1,235 .261 .354 .445 .799

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

Preceded by:
Steve Garvey
National League Player of the Month
April, 1977
Succeeded by:
Ken Reitz
Preceded by:
Mike Schmidt
World Series MVP (with Pedro Guerrero and Steve Yeager)
1981
Succeeded by:
Darrell Porter
Preceded by:
Tug McGraw
Babe Ruth Award
1981
Succeeded by:
Bruce Sutter
Preceded by:
Tommy John
Lou Gehrig Memorial Award
1982
Succeeded by:
Mike Schmidt

Template:1981 Los Angeles Dodgers Template:World Series MVPs Template:Lou Gehrig Memorial Award Template:Babe Ruth Award

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