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1994

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1994 throughout the world.  

This year in baseball

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Sources

Headline Event of the YearEdit

As a result of a player's strike, the MLB season ends prematurely on August 11, 1994. No World Series is played. Minor League Baseball is not affected.

The Yomiuri Giants celebrate their sixtieth anniversary with their eighteenth championship in the Japan Series.

ChampionsEdit

Top Professional LeagueEdit

  • Japan Series: Yomiuri Giants over Seibu Lions (4-2).
  • Series Most Valuable Player: Hiromi Makihara
  • Series Fighting Spirit Award: Kazuhiro Kiyohara (awarded to player who showed the best (THE BEST WHAT??)

Minor League Baseball in the United States -- AAA LeaguesEdit

TriviaEdit

  • Games 1 and 2 of the Albuquerque-Vancouver PCL Championship Series were seven innings. Because of a rainout September 13, the two games were made up as two seven-inning doublehaders the next day, in compliance with minor league rules regarding doubleheaders.
  • Three players in the 1994 Japan Series -- Dan Gladden (Yomuiri), Mike Pagliarulo (Seibu), and Hideki Matsui (Yomiuri) -- played in a World Series (Gladden and Pagliarulo 1991, Matsui 2003). Gladden, who retired after the season, finished his career by becoming another player to win both the World Series and Japan Series, with this being his third world championship.
  • With the influx of American media at the Japan Series, and the Chicago White Sox broadcast crew, the coverage of the championship was Matsui's first brush with American media, and was a breakout year for the player known as "Godzilla," in his second year as a pro.

Other championsEdit

Awards and honorsEdit

Statistical LeadersEdit

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Paul O'Neill NYY .359 Tony Gwynn SDP .394
HR Ken Griffey SEA 40 Matt Williams SFG 43
RBI Kirby Puckett MIN 112 Jeff Bagwell HOU 116
Wins Jimmy Key NYY 17 Ken Hill HOU &
Greg Maddux ATL
16
ERA Steve Ontiveros OAK 2.65 Greg Maddux ATL 1.56
Ks Randy Johnson SEA 204 Andy Benes SDP 189

Major League Baseball final standings Edit

American League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
East Division
1st New York Yankees 70 43 .619     --
2nd Baltimore Orioles 63 49 .562   6.5
3rd Toronto Blue Jays 55 60 .478 16.0
4th Boston Red Sox 54 61 .470 17.0
5th Detroit Tigers 53 62 .461 18.0
Central Division
1st Chicago White Sox 67 46 .593     --
2nd Cleveland Indians 66 47 .584   1.0
3rd Kansas City Royals 64 51 .557   4.0
4th Minnesota Twins 53 60 .469 14.0
5th Milwaukee Brewers 53 62 .461 15.0
West Division
1st Texas Rangers 52 62 .456     --
2nd Oakland Athletics 51 63 .447   1.0
3rd Seattle Mariners 49 63 .438   2.0
4th California Angels 47 68 .409 5.5
National League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
East Division
1st Montreal Expos 74 40 .649     --
2nd Atlanta Braves 68 46 .596   6.0
3rd New York Mets 55 58 .487 18.5
4th Philadelphia Phillies 54 61 .470 20.5
5th Florida Marlins 51 64 .443 23.5
Central Division
1st Cincinnati Reds 66 48 .579     --
2nd Houston Astros 66 49 .574   0.5
3rd Pittsburgh Pirates 53 61 .465 13.0
3rd St. Louis Cardinals 53 61 .465 13.0
5th Chicago Cubs 49 64 .434 16.5
West Division
1st Los Angeles Dodgers 58 56 .509     --
2nd San Francisco Giants 55 60 .478   3.5
3rd Colorado Rockies 53 64 .453   6.5
4th San Diego Padres 47 70 .402 12.5
  • On September 14, the remainder of the major league season was canceled by acting commissioner Bud Selig after 34 days of the players' strike.

EventsEdit

  • February 15 - Ila Borders becomes the first woman to pitch in a college game. Appearing for Southern California College of Cosa Mesa, she throws a 5-hit game against Claremont-Mudd-Scripps, 12-1.
  • August 11 - The final games of the Major League season are played on this date. The next day, the players strike begins. Minor League Baseball games are not affected.
  • September 14 - The remainder of the major league season is canceled by acting commissioner Bud Selig after 34 days of the players' strike. There will be no World Series for the first time since 1904.
  • September 20 - Albuquerque ends the professional baseball season in the United States, winning the Pacific Coast League championship.
  • October 22 - The Japan Series begins as baseball's professional championship. Reporters from major American newspapers arrive in Japan for their Fall Classic coverage. Ken Harrelson, the play-by-play announcer for the Chicago White Sox, calls the Japan Series for US audiences on regional sports networks under the Prime SportsChannel banner.
  • October 29 - The Yomiuri Giants win Game 6 of the Japan Series to become professional baseball's world champions. Legend says this is the luckiest of all championship years, as it was the team's sixtieth anniversary, as they are deemed World Champions by the baseball media.

MoviesEdit

DeathsEdit

  • January 8 - Harvey Haddix, 68, All-Star pitcher best remembered for a 1959 game with the Pirates in which he threw 12 perfect innings before losing in the 13th; won 20 games for 1953 Cardinals and earned three Gold Gloves
  • January 9 - Johnny Temple, 66, All-Star second baseman, primarily for the Cincinnati Reds, who batted .300 three times
  • January 10 - Chub Feeney, 72, National League president from 1970 to 1986
  • February 12 - Ray Dandridge, 80, Hall of Fame third baseman of the Negro Leagues who often batted over .350
  • March 16 - Eric Show, 37, pitcher who won 100 games for the San Diego Padres and surrendered Pete Rose's record 4,192nd hit
  • June 12 - Jim Brock, 57, coach at Arizona State since 1972 who led the school to two College World Series titles
  • June 23 - Marv Throneberry, 62, first baseman for the Yankees, Orioles, Mets and Kansas City A's
  • July 14 - César Tovar, 54, outfielder for the Minnesota Twins who in 1968 became the second major leaguer to play all nine positions in a game; had his team's only hit on five occasions
  • September 5 - Hank Aguirre, 63, All-Star pitcher who led AL in ERA in 1962 with the Detroit Tigers
  • December 26 - Allie Reynolds, 77, 6-time All-Star pitcher, mainly with the Yankees, who led AL in ERA in 1952 and in strikeouts and shutouts twice; in 1951 was first AL pitcher to throw two no-hitters in same year, and was MVP runnerup in 1952; career .630 winning percentage

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